It's hard to imagine anybody living a normal life in the Gaza strip. Frequently labeled as the world's largest open-air prison, it makes an apperance on news reports every time a confrontation erupts between Israel and Hamas.

From TV sets thousands of miles away, this tiny piece of land has been reduced to an image of violence, chaos and destruction. So what do the people do when they’re not under siege?

This elegantly shot and masterfully crafted portrait of Palestinian life offers a rare chance to be immersed in the heart of Gaza, as we glimpse behind the walls of this misunderstood land to get to know real people who inhabit it. Inside a Gaza City taxi, we meet a teacher, a student, and a barber, who all share their dreams and daily predicaments with the driver, Ahmed, using surprising humor and candor. Ahmed could take them anywhere—except that a decade-old blockade makes it nearly impossible to leave the enclave.

Reviews

Like its people, Gaza’s landscape feels kaleidoscopic: colorful yet pained, fragile yet resilient, ancient while looking to the future. Memory plays heavy on its consciousness. But life moves in cycles in Gaza, and, in spite of everything, joy and humanity can be found in every corner of this mosaic of life.
It’s a raw, emotive film, one that demands to be watched, and is unapologetic in its goals.